The 5 Most Persuasive Words

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Today I come by this means to give you information that I consider very important for all those who work with online sales.

  • No matter how unselfish you are, you probably still find yourself trying to influence people to do the things you want them to do? (always in a positive way)
  • So why fight it?

Here are the four most effective words you can use to achieve your goals.

THE WORD: YOU

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I'm Very focusing on technology, strategy, and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

There’s an often-cited study in the copywriting world about a piece of Yale research that reveals “You” to be the #1 power word out of a supposed 12.

Despite the fact that the study likely never happened, I have some actual research that reveals the power of invoking the self.

As it turns out, while people might like the word “you,” it is guaranteed that they love reading their own name much more.

According to recent research examining brain activation, few things light us up quite like seeing our own names in print or on the screen. Our names are intrinsically tied to our self-perception and make up a massive part of our identity. No surprise then, that we become more engaged and even more trusting of a message in which our name appears.

Research has shown that we will gladly pay more for personalization, so isn’t it about time you start getting personal with your customers?

However, there is one small problem with this finding …

Writing general web copy with name utilization in mind isn’t usually possible, but by capitalizing on the power of permission marketing, you can adapt this strategy easily — many email lists are greatly aided by being able to start off messages with a customer’s name.

While that may not be important for your blog updates, if you maintain a variety of separate lists for your products (and you should), make sure you’re grabbing the first name to make your broadcasts trigger that personal aspect with customers.

THE WORD: FREE

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Everybody loves free.

People love free stuff so much they’ll actually make different choices, even when the respective value of the item or service remains the same.

Use free only when it makes sense, and only in the right context.

Emphasizing the “freeness” of your free guides, courses, information, support, etc., can go a long way in attracting attention. On Sparring Mind, I emphasize the fact that my newsletter is “free to join,” because although most marketers understand this, many folks don’t quite understand what it means to subscribe.

Conversely, you should use minimal pricing to keep out those barnacle customers who aren’t ideal long-term buyers, or who aren’t truly suited for your flagship offerings.

THE WORD: BECAUSE

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In the 1970s she conducted a famous experiment in the psychology of persuasion. It involved people in an office who were queuing to use a photocopier. She got an actor to run to the front of the line and try to be allowed to jump the queue. The actor tried different excuses. Initially, he said, ‘Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the photocopier?’ His request was granted 60% of the time. However, his success increased to 94% when he dashed up and said the same thing but added, ‘..because I am in a rush.’

Next, the actor said something a little different, ‘Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the photocopier because I need some copies.’ His success rate was 93%. This is despite the fact that ‘because I need copies’ is obvious if you want to use the copier. Langer deduced that it was the word because that caused the different response and not what came after it. It seems that people are more likely to agree to do something if you give them a because…

The lesson is that you will be much more persuasive if you give people a reason (almost any reason) to comply with your request. So do not just say to your teenager, ‘Please tidy your room.’ Say something like, ‘Please tidy your room because then we will be able to find things.’

If you want to increase your influence use the word because – because it works!

THE WORD: INSTANTLY 

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he subject of delayed gratification is an important one among neuroscientists, as many famous studies (such as the Stanford marshmallow experiment) showcase how being able to delay rewards to a later date is a skill needed to become successful. (I know very few entrepreneurs who would argue against that.)

The reason this interests us as marketers is because it reveals an interesting aspect of human nature 

We want things yesterday!

Several MRI studies have shown just how fired up our mid-brain gets when we envision instant rewards, and how it’s our frontal cortex that’s activated when it comes to waiting for something (that’s a no-no for sales).

Words like “instant,” “immediately,” or even”fast” are triggers for flipping the switch on that mid-brain activity.

If you are in the business of selling web-based software, you already have an advantage here: “instant access” isn’t a vague promise, it’s often the reality. For those in the physical products or services business, reminding customers that they will receive their product quickly (or someone will get in touch with them ASAP) can go a long way in being the gentle push they need to buy.

We’ve seen how even “tightwad customers” can be swayed with these subtle changes in language to insinuate fast pain removal. It’s a reliable tactic for converting more prospects into customers as long as you follow the one golden rule …

Always deliver on your promises. And, whenever possible, over deliver.

This is an area where many businesses get too optimistic, and although it’s smart to emphasize these instant rewards, it’s also always a good idea to underpromise and over-deliver, so be sure you can actually follow through on your promises or you may end up with a “tribe” that hates your guts.

THE WORD: NEW

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This one almost seems paradoxical.

According to neuroimaging research, we actually respond more favorably to recognized brands and can have a hefty amount of disdain for any drastic changes. (Remember New Coke? Oh, the horror)

On the other hand, it’s long been known that novelty plays an incredibly important role in activating our brain’s reward center and in keeping us content with our products.

“Newness” is important to products, especially because research has shown that they age far more quickly than “experiential” purchases. (In other words, you’ll hate your new headphones in 2 years, but that concert you went to 5 years ago probably aged in your mind like a fine wine.)

How can you achieve a zen-like balance against these two contradictory sides of the same word?

The important things to consider here are which parts of your business generate trust, and which parts generate utility. It’s your brand that creates trust, and as the saying goes, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Your products, however, are what customers get utility out of, and stagnant offerings are your first class ticket to an abysmally bored user base.

Your core brand elements like your unique selling proposition, your dazzling customer service and your quality offering in the marketplace should be approached with excessive caution if things are going well.

With your products, it’s far easier to excite customers with new features and polish. Even if things don’t work out perfectly, a majority of customers will appreciate innovation attempts over no progression at all (unless you pull a Digg v4 and ruin everything in one fell swoop).

New fixes to old problems, new features and improvements, a fresh new design, or even new ways of getting your message out there (Red Bull anyone?) are all essential for keeping your customers “on their toes,” without losing the trust that has cemented you as an awesome brand in their mind.

so Why Are Some Words More Persuasive Than Others? Check it out!!

The art of selling is so important in your life because I believe that a lot of things in life are selling processes.

To your Success 

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